A Repost: The Fabulous 40

Back at the end of 2015, WWS organizer, Tisha Marie Reichle, curated this fantastic list of 40 feminist journals to support and submit to in 2016. Since we are coming to the end of 2017, why not challenge yourself to hit up a couple of these markets before the new year? Check out these journals that didn’t make it on to our first list–Gigantic SequenceLady/Liberty/LitMothers Always WriteVIDA, Women in Literary Arts, and What Fresh Witch is This–and be sure to share any new journals we missed in the comments! 

NPG x126136; Jackie Collins; Joan Collins by Terry O'Neill

by Terry O’Neill, bromide fibre print, 1970s

The Fabulous 40: Sister Journals to Read, Support, and Submit to in 2016

by Tisha Reichle

When setting your reading and writing goals for 2016, consider the work being done by other women writers and editors – people like you! Think about subscribing to one or more of the journals listed below. Make a conscious effort to read print and online journals edited/curated by women writers. Submit your work regularly to the journals and magazines that address themes you are writing about. As we move towards being more responsible literary citizens in the upcoming year, keep our sister writers in mind. (Information below is edited from each journal/magazine website information.)

If there are publications that have not been included on this list, please add a brief description and a link in the comments below so others can learn about it and we can update our information.

13th Moon: A Feminist Literary Magazine
Founded in 1973 in the ferment of early second wave feminism, as a home for women writers and their readers. Because the surrounding culture has tended to erase women writers from history, their work has needed rediscovery, preservation and its own dedicated space each generation. Continue reading

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Shine Brightly: On Literary Citizenship and Class

by Stephanie Abraham

Acting as a good literary citizen means participating in and taking responsibility for our literary communities. As writers, this means that in addition to promoting our own work, we share work by writers we admire; attend readings at independent bookstores; buy books written by local authors and look for opportunities to mentor. For most of us, literary citizenship is an extension of our everyday lives. It’s important to acknowledge the following three points, however, which often get left out of the conversation:

Community matters – and so do you.

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