WWS CHAPTER PUBLICATION ROUND UP FOR NOVEMBER

Congratulations to all the women and nonbinary writers who have been published this month! Here is publication news from WWS-SF!

From Janna Layton’s poem, “The Seventh Room,” in the literary magazine Polu Texni:

The Masque of the Red Death” is short—
a story in seven pages—
and so much of it
is Poe’s description of the rooms,
the twisting ballrooms of the castle
where Prince Prospero has locked himself away
from the plague.

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A Repost: The Fabulous 40

Back at the end of 2015, WWS organizer, Tisha Marie Reichle, curated this fantastic list of 40 feminist journals to support and submit to in 2016. Since we are coming to the end of 2017, why not challenge yourself to hit up a couple of these markets before the new year? Check out these journals that didn’t make it on to our first list–Gigantic SequenceLady/Liberty/LitMothers Always WriteVIDA, Women in Literary Arts, and What Fresh Witch is This–and be sure to share any new journals we missed in the comments! 

NPG x126136; Jackie Collins; Joan Collins by Terry O'Neill

by Terry O’Neill, bromide fibre print, 1970s

The Fabulous 40: Sister Journals to Read, Support, and Submit to in 2016

by Tisha Reichle

When setting your reading and writing goals for 2016, consider the work being done by other women writers and editors – people like you! Think about subscribing to one or more of the journals listed below. Make a conscious effort to read print and online journals edited/curated by women writers. Submit your work regularly to the journals and magazines that address themes you are writing about. As we move towards being more responsible literary citizens in the upcoming year, keep our sister writers in mind. (Information below is edited from each journal/magazine website information.)

If there are publications that have not been included on this list, please add a brief description and a link in the comments below so others can learn about it and we can update our information.

13th Moon: A Feminist Literary Magazine
Founded in 1973 in the ferment of early second wave feminism, as a home for women writers and their readers. Because the surrounding culture has tended to erase women writers from history, their work has needed rediscovery, preservation and its own dedicated space each generation. Continue reading

Behind the Editor’s Desk: An Interview with Siel Ju

We are reposting this interview with Siel Ju from August, 2016, in celebration of her book release! Cake Time, a novel in stories, is out on April 6th from Red Hen Press. If you’re in L.A., come join Siel and special guests at Skylight Books on April 5th for the book release party. More events are listed here. Congratulations, Siel!

by Lauren Eggert-Crowe

Siel Ju is the editor of Flash Flash Click, an online lit zine for fast fiction. Subscribers get a weekly flash prose piece delivered every Tuesday. The pieces range in style, tone, and content but all have a compelling narrative driving them, no matter how short. Some veer more towards the lyrical and sublime while others give the reader a sardonic slice-of-life from a first-person narrator. Siel has featured such authors as Wendy C. Ortiz, Catherine Daly, Lisa Cheby, Maureen Gibbon and Molly Fuller. I asked Siel a few questions about her job as editor of Flash Flash Click.

Why did you decide to start Flash Flash Click? 

The impetus came from feeling there was a big, untapped population of readers out there who weren’t being reached by the current literary marketplace. I have friends who are writers, but I also have many non-writer friends who are smart and literate — who might very well enjoy reading poems and stories but are completely unfamiliar with the world of literary journals. I think a lot of people don’t even know literary journals exist! So the idea was to start a lit zine that sent a short piece a week via email — tiny bits of prose that can be read easily on a smartphone — sort of like a gateway drug to entice “regular” people to become regular readers of contemporary fiction and poetry. Continue reading

A WWS PUBLICATION ROUND UP FOR DECEMBER

An eventful year finally winds down as we all look forward to a fresh start in 2017. Congratulations to all the Women Who Submit members who have had work published in 2016 and to those who sent their work into the world in December.

From Tisha Marie Reichle‘s “An Argument Against Old Cheese” in Ghost Town:

“What did you do to your hair?” Mother exclaimed, sorry she’d sent Beth to the neighborhood salon alone. “What about your graduation pictures?”

Beth fingered the brightly colored stripes that corrupted her freshly-cropped, light-brown hair. “That’s why I did it! The green and orange match the Ducks!” She was ecstatic about leaving her isolated desert home for the lush consciousness of Oregon in August. Until then, she had other problems to worry about. She kissed her mother on the cheek and ran out the door.

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"Remington" by Mark Grapengater (flickr.com/mgrap). Original link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mgrap/2261210942/in/photolist-4rPiey-37ASje-MUwf8-dXXLCh-bBSf6F-Wdari-8gQCTK-pJLZ1-BYpmP-dmn5g3-gHKpus-dSDBv9-5prNbT-5y4Y3Q-6SZGVh-81FxpK-6SVEgx-cR4sY9-dmn1gF-6SZGTJ-dmn4mz-878fHx-auJWRu-auGeC8-dmn5QX-8uXJ49-9DofZL-ezhHew-auGfwH-auGgqH-d59cyC-x13xS-auGgSz-ma1E7G-dmn929-dmn9aS-6ZA9Sv-dmn5qr-auGf58-6ZA9Mp-dF4Zk6-auJVsQ-qX6Mkb-rBDo5B-r6hX1j-rRNCAL-qNcJP1-rBDobt-6ZEaKL-85H5Ye

Behind the Editor’s Desk: An Interview with Siel Ju

by Lauren Eggert-Crowe

Siel Ju is the editor of Flash Flash Click, an online lit zine for fast fiction. Subscribers get a weekly flash prose piece delivered every Tuesday. The pieces range in style, tone, and content but all have a compelling narrative driving them, no matter how short. Some veer more towards the lyrical and sublime while others give the reader a sardonic slice-of-life from a first-person narrator. Siel has featured such authors as Wendy C. Ortiz, Catherine Daly, Lisa Cheby, Maureen Gibbon and Molly Fuller. I asked Siel a few questions about her job as editor of Flash Flash Click.

Why did you decide to start Flash Flash Click? 

The impetus came from feeling there was a big, untapped population of readers out there who weren’t being reached by the current literary marketplace. I have friends who are writers, but I also have many non-writer friends who are smart and literate — who might very well enjoy reading poems and stories but are completely unfamiliar with the world of literary journals. I think a lot of people don’t even know literary journals exist! So the idea was to start a lit zine that sent a short piece a week via email — tiny bits of prose that can be read easily on a smartphone — sort of like a gateway drug to entice “regular” people to become regular readers of contemporary fiction and poetry.

What sets Flash Flash Click apart from other online journals? Continue reading

May Submission Deadlines: 9 under $15

By Lisbeth Coiman

Here is our submission call list for May. Today I bring you five deadlines and five open calls all but one under $15. Polish your piece, submit, and track. Find support in your community to celebrate each other’s success, but make time to hold your writing buddies through rejections. Keep writing. Submit hard.

 1.Gloom Cupboard

Deadline: May 15, 2016

Submission Guidelines: 

http://gloomcupboard.com/https://gloomcupboard.com/submission-guidelines/ 

Reading fee: $3 Continue reading

Submitting on a Budget: Network

by Lisbeth Coiman

Where writing has become a self-employment enterprise, tracking expenses is vital for the emergent writer struggling to build her brand. Conferences, books, subscriptions, writing courses, memberships, tracking sites, and submission fees all add up quickly to a limited writing budget.

Arguably, artists can create great work without ever attending conferences, reading peers’ books, or participating in workshops, but writing great pieces is only one step in the process of getting published. Unless the emergent writer enjoys the benefit of a well-connected literary circle, a consistent flow of submissions to literary journals, contests, and online magazines is the only road to publication. Gaining access to information about submission calls takes up most of the money set aside to submit work. For that reason, submitting to publications on a regular basis on a shoestring requires a well thought submission plan.

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